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Bliss Feedback Therapy

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futurehealth.org

An "associate' of bliss is made use of in meditation. A pitfall in meditation is to start believing this "associate' of bliss as real, pushing the bliss itself to the background.

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In my previous articles, I have dwelt on the terms - "consciousness', "apparent self', "inner self' and the process of "meditation'. The feeling of bliss, which is formless, is perceived and sustained by the individual through the "built-in biofeedback'.

During the process of meditation, when the individual consciously tries to reach the bliss of the "inner self', he uses a framework to perceive the formless bliss. A sensory perception, usually visual or auditory, that is associated with inner bliss is made use of by the mind. This "associate' of bliss depends on the method of meditation.

A pitfall in meditation is to start believing this "associate' of bliss as real, pushing the bliss itself to the background. Individuals may be practicing a particular method of meditation in a mechanical way forgetting the bliss. True meditation would always focus on the bliss, which is the essence.

Philosophically speaking, all religions help individuals to reach their blissful "inner self'. They use auditory or visual frameworks to help the individual to perceive the bliss within oneself. If this primary purpose of religion is understood, then the apparent "rituals' of religion become more meaningful.

Once established in bliss, the framework is no longer needed. However since we are frequently distanced from bliss, we need to be reestablished in bliss by constantly remembering the framework that is associated with bliss. With guidance and by practice, reaching and remaining in a state of bliss becomes easier.

Enjoying a state of bliss implies that the mind, body and the spirit are in an optimal state of health. The quality of sleep is good and this ensures a whole lot of health benefits. Any disease that might have set in heals faster when the individual practices meditation. Meditation may thus be called as "bliss feedback therapy'.

 

Vijayaraghavan Padmanabhan is a Professor of Medicine at Stanley Medical College, Chennai, India.

The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

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