Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon

Sebern Fisher

                 

I have 4 fans:
Become a Fan
Become a Fan.
You'll get emails whenever I post articles on Futurehealth

Sebern Fisher is a psychodynamic psychotherapist with a primary interest in the importance of secure attachment throughout the life span. She incorporated neurofeedback into her clinical practice in 1997. The effects of brain training that she has both experienced and witnessed have had significant impact on the way she now conceptualizes personality, self, psychopathology and even free will.

Emerging theory in all fields of psychotherapy is focused on the importance of affect regulation. After almost ten years of work with neurofeedback, Sebern has come to believe that the single most important contribution of neurofeedback is regulation of affect, and further, that the most important affect to regulate is fear. In pursuit of this, she discovered the site FPO2, "the gateway to the amygdala", in 1999, and uses it specifically to quiet fear and reactivity. She has fully integrated neurofeedback into her practice of psychotherapy, rarely now, providing one without the other. She works with people suffering from conditions as apparently diverse as PTSD, dyslexia, dissociative disorders, Asperger's, and attachment disorder.

 
Sebern was the Clinical Director of a residential treatment center for severely disturbed adolescents for fifteen years, where she implemented the first milieu DBT program in the US. She now maintains a private practice in Northampton, Massachusetts. She is an owner of EEG Spectrum International, and speaks nationally and internationally on neurofeedback, on the integration of neurofeedback and psychotherapy, and on attachment and neurofeedback.

Futurehealth Member for 356 week(s) and 6 day(s)

1 Articles, 0 Quick Links, 0 Comments, 0 Diaries, 0 Polls

Articles Listed By Date   List By Popularity

Sunday, April 24, 2011      Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon
Neurofeedback: A Treatment for Reactive Attachment Disorder The widespread failure to recognize Reactive Attachment Disorder (to be referred to as RAD) and the lack of understanding of neurofeedback make writing about RAD and neurofeedback a somewhat daunting prospect. It is, however, timely.