Share on Google Plus Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on PInterest Share on Fark! Share on Reddit Share on StumbleUpon Tell A Friend

Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites   No comments
Articles

Part Three: Talking with Dr. Temple Grandin, Author of "Animals in Translation"

By       Message Joan Brunwasser     Permalink
      (Page 1 of 10 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; , Add Tags Add to My Group(s)

View Ratings | Rate It

futurehealth.org Headlined to H4 10/27/09

This is the third and final segment of my interview with Dr. Temple Grandin, noted author and animal handling expert. You mentioned before that connection between autism and genius, Temple. And in fact you have a whole chapter in your book about that. I'm sure that will be controversial. Can you give some examples for our readers?



Temple Grandin


Well, Einstein today would be labeled autistic. He had no language until age three and when you read biographies of Einstein, when he was a child he had a lot of autistic traits: not very social, a lot of solitary play with blocks and with playing cards, a typical autistic trait. There's two ways nature can build a brain: it can build a brain to be more a thinking and cognitive brain or a brain to be more social. It takes a kind of process of circuits in the brain to make a person really social. Basically, with the mild form of autism, which is Asperger's, you think of all the people who work in the computer field. There are tons of them that are not diagnosed, that are just Asperger mild autism. Geeks and nerds and Asperger's are the same thing. People on the spectrum tend to be more interested in things than interested in just social chitchat. And if you didn't have any people in this world interested in things, we'd still be living in caves.

The other side of that coin is that autistic kids often suffer from the insensitivity and cruelty of their peers.


I had a terrible time in high school. I was just teased absolutely horribly. It was terrible.

I'd like to hear about that. But I'd also like to discuss something else. At some point, you learned how to adopt some social graces in order to be able to function.

You have to learn social rules like being in a play. I didn't even know that people had all these secret little eye signals until I read about them in a book when I was 50 years old. I didn't even know they existed. You have to learn social rules like saying "please" and "thank you" and being polite and not pushing in line just like being in a play. Sort of like, you go to a foreign country; what are the customs of the foreign country? You have to just learn social rules sort of like you're acting in a play.

It's like learning a foreign language.

Next Page  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10

 

- Advertisement -

View Ratings | Rate It

www.OpEdNews.com
Joan has been the Election Integrity Editor for OpEdNews since December 2005. She writes on a large range of subjects and does many interviews and reviews.

Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon



Go To Commenting
The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Writers Guidelines