Contact through the website: www.forwardtherapy.com
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Ash Rehn  

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Ash Rehn is an online counsellor and therapist with over 20 years experience in counselling. He specialises in motivation & confidence, relationship issues, sexuality and addiction. His online counselling practice is called Forward Therapy.

www.forwardtherapy.com

Futurehealth Member for 517 week(s) and 6 day(s)

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(1 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Wednesday, June 2, 2010
What is Sex Addiction? Questions from a Narrative Psychotherapy Perspective (1456 views) This article examines the problems with the idea of Sex Addiction, and the possibilities for revealing more helpful and relevant understandings of problems that come from using the techniques of Narrative Therapy.
Ash Rehn, counsellor & therapist, From Images
(1 comments) SHARE More Sharing        Sunday, May 23, 2010
Using Life Metaphors in Gay Counselling & Psychotherapy (1117 views) Metaphors provide a way for clients and therapists to work in partnership in counselling and psychotherapy. This article examines the use of metaphors in gay counselling to assist clients to come to their own interpretations and start finding answers and solutions to problems about relationships, friendship and trust.
SHARE More Sharing        Thursday, March 4, 2010
A Starter Conversation for Problems with Alcohol. (817 views) When faced with an alcohol problem many people describe themselves as sick, diseased or alcoholic. This article offers an alternative way of thinking about problem drinking by considering the power of alcohol and the opportunity to change the relationship one has with alcohol.